© 2018 Andy Shepherd.                

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Sara Ogilvie - illustrator

I love illustrated books. If you want to see how much, then check out my earlier post.    


But I hadn’t dared imagine that my books would be illustrated, or if they were I thought they might just be small chapter heading illustrations.

So, when I had my first meeting with my editor and she told me that they were keen for the books to be highly illustrated I was over the moon. I have to admit that this was one of the most exciting parts for me.

When the team at Piccadilly Press suggested Sara Ogilvie I was even more excited. I love her picture books (‘Rhinos Don’t Eat Pancakes’, written by Anna Kemp & illustrated by Sara, is a particular favourite) and I’d recently come to know her work in older fiction through the wonderful Storey Street books by Phil Earle.

'The Boy Who Grew Dragons' illustration ©Sara Ogilvie

Sara is one of those illustrators who is equally fabulous illustrating animals and people. Her drawings are quirky and full of character and detail, which I absolutely love. Just take a look at ‘The Detective Dog’ written by Julia Donaldson, which Sara illustrated.

There is so much going on in those pictures. And they have such warmth and charm.

 

I wanted the ‘The Boy Who Grew Dragons’ to be a story with a warm heart at its centre – in among the exploding poo and chaos! So I knew from the start that Sara was going to be the perfect person to illustrate the books.

'The Boy Who Grew Dragons' ©Sara Ogilvie

I am a huge believer in the power of pictures in books. I was always drawn to books that were illustrated and some of my strongest memories from reading are of the pictures I pored over.

 

And when I got older I spent several years reading nothing but comics – thanks to my Mum who was a firm believer in letting me read whatever I chose. Pictures drew me in, they engaged me in the act of reading at a time I might have switched off to it, and every time I pick up a book with pictures I find my reading experience enriched so much by them.

The illustrator Sarah McIntyre has been leading a campaign called #PicturesMeanBusiness and I’d encourage everyone to check out their site to see how we as writers, parents, readers and reviewers can support illustrators.

If you’d like to find out more about Sara Ogilvie’s work and other books she has illustrated please click here.

 

And please can I ask that if you are reviewing ‘The Boy Who Grew Dragons’ that you include an acknowledgement to Sara Ogilvie for the artwork.

Thank you!